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The Lost Generation by tuomaskoivurinne The Lost Generation by tuomaskoivurinne
acrylics 2011,
German artilleryman loading a 15 cm shell with a personal message to his enemy.
I think I was after the sort of vicious circle of retaliation the men were pulled into.

Done for April MGWAT in the Great War Forum.
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:iconnyanpuppy:
NyanPuppy Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Fun fact, artillery crews sent messages to each other on their shells, most of the time, they weren't even insults or taunts! :o
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:iconjulius1880:
julius1880 Featured By Owner May 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
An excellent piece of art.
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:iconwolfwithglasses:
WolfwithGlasses Featured By Owner May 7, 2011
Hehe I think painting the Projectiles of the artillery with nice writings was pretty famous on both sides.
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner May 7, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Seen several photos of soldiers of all nations, posing beside artillery shells with writings and greetings on them. Easy to imagine, little humour to counter all that horrid business. Sometimes mind just works that way.
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:iconulfsark:
Ulfsark Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
great work. :thumbsup:
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
thanks :)
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:iconannecat:
AnneCat Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011
So much machinery! I'm a coward about painting non-organic shapes. This is so well-done, especially that delicately-rendered wheel? valve? on the left, with the white highlights. The palette and style of the whole piece made me initially think it was in watercolor, until I clicked on the thumbnail. Or is it mixed media?

This picture made me think strongly of a poem I read yesterday: Ammunition Column, by Gilbert Frankau. The first line is "I am only a cog in a giant machine, a link of an endless chain," and it's definitely about that whole concept of being stuck in a neverending cycle of fighting.
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you. For some reason, I find that machines are generally difficult to draw (thus I use a lot of references). And this is just acrylics, it turns very similar to watercolour in places.
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:iconyourfreedomfighter:
YourFreedomFighter Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Professional General Artist
Very well done!

Yikes, that yellow banded shell looks like possible MG or Yperite. Glad I'm not on the receiving end.
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Just shrapnel, (as discussed below) the gas shell had more yellow painted on it. Anyway, nasty to be in the business end... Thank you :)
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:iconyourfreedomfighter:
YourFreedomFighter Featured By Owner May 1, 2011  Professional General Artist
Ah, yes! Thanks for the correction. That's right, they did have more bands usually.

You are welcome. ^_^
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:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
So awesome! The picture is perfect, the colours are really perfect for a war-situation, all the details are just great and the message also includes some feelings of the soldiers
(Für Otto t 1915 = For Otto t 1915) maybe his comrade or family-member, sounds so sad...
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you and thanks for adding it into your Group. Feel free to ask for more from my WW1-archives, many depicting the Germans in WW1.
As for Otto... we will never know if he was a friend, brother or a pet.
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:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I took you by the word and added as much pics, as I could identify as german ones^^ If I forgot one, feel free to add them in teh group. Adding pictures in groups makes them more famous, more people can find them.
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, with a quick peek, these were left out [link] [link] [link] [link]
Also, there are some "civilian" and "war veteran" pieces, that don't depic a specific nation, might be British, French or German, just the same...
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:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ok great, you draw so awesome! Go on with your work :)

cu
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:iconsergey72:
sergey72 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011
Great art!:clap:
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you :)
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:iconsergey72:
sergey72 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011
Great art!:clap:
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:iconemirhamam:
EmirHamam Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh, you are alive! Great one Tuomas, as usual!
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Barely. But thank you :)
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:iconpavelkirilovich:
PavelKirilovich Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011
Oh and it's good to see something from you. You fell off the face of the earth for a bit there, mina jatkat.
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:iconpavelkirilovich:
PavelKirilovich Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011
As always, good technical work and excellent attention to historical detail. Your figures have improved dramatically; this guy looks proportionately perfect given that he's in the process of loading a fieldpiece, hence having hips squared to the breech and shoulders turned slightly. And as always, and what has always caught my eye, the colour palette is nothing less than perfect.

I was just reading a paper on the evolution of German doctrine during WWI. 58 pages, PDF format if you're interested.
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:iconmulta:
multa Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011
I was just reading a paper on the evolution of German doctrine during WWI. 58 pages, PDF format if you're interested.

Dunno about Tuomas (well I can make a guess lol), but I am.
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:iconpavelkirilovich:
PavelKirilovich Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2011
Alright, send me a note with your e-mail address and I'll send it across to you as well.
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Of course I'm interested :) I did "fell off" for a bit, and migh "fall off" again for short period. Trying to get a legal name as tattooist, but the sight of the paper work included frustrates (never started up a company before).

Where to start? In my opinion, some aspects in drawing humans are developing, but the faces still resemble eachother too much. I need more variation in the faces. The colours are down-to-earth, the Bluse is too green, should be more grey. I could have done the early-war M1907/10 Feldrock, but then I couldn't have included those coloured shoulderstraps of the Imperial Fußartillerie. Also, not entirely happy with the Feldhaubitze (15cm. lg.s.F.H. 1913/02) either. Lot of techical drawing, and not even sure what each detail is.
Scheiße! Only good thing is, that I have a good excuse to invigorate my text with italics.
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:iconpavelkirilovich:
PavelKirilovich Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011
You get a pass on the uniform colours because it's rather difficult to find a genuine item photographed in neutral lighting to mix your palette correctly.

I didn't mention the faces because yes, they still have a Clone Army thing happening. Perhaps its time you start doing facial study sketches in your off time to work up some variety in bone structures.

The 150 gun looks good. Technical detail is good; no hinge on the upper shield, simplified gunner station, and Otto will be remembered with a 15cm chlorine gas shell judging from the colour banding. I reckon the gun crew should be wearing masks, actually, but I suppose that by this point - 1915/early 1916 - the shells have become stable enough to be fired without chemical protection. I was interested to read about chemical warfare techniques on the Western Front and in particular the use of HE to erode mask discipline while laying down a chemical barrage; the concussion causes troopers to freak out and pull the mask off, as the mask amplifies the concussive force and makes it harder to breathe. You're already well aware of how hard it is to breathe in a mask, though granted, the designs we've tried were better than the period designs then. Is the following link contain the reference photograph?
[link]

I'll e-mail you the study when I finish reading it. So far it's quite good save for a few typos you'll spot, nothing that should confuse too badly. Initial look at the evolution of defensive tactics, followed by the evolution of offensive tactics. I finally understand why the Germans took such heavy losses during the static years before the great offensives of 1918, because after 1915 you don't really hear about them putting in any major attacks at all; turns out their defence-in-depth system only came into being in 1917.
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes, that's the original photo I based my sketch. Good site!
And I got you there; although the German 15cm T-shell was the first actual gas shell used in action, the one depicted here is shrapnel (was hard to find a proper reference, and I think it should be more blueish in colour). The gas shell had bigger portion painted in yellow, but these are just details. You're correct about the mask-thing, and I would have depicted the artillerist with a gas mask, if he would have been dealing with chemicals.
Fighting in gas masks must have been terrible experience.

The only actual German offensive in 1915 (in the West) was the Second Ypres, then it was once again time for the British and the French to keep banging their heads into the wall. Germans dug deeper and we know how well this bore fruit in 1916. However, during the 1916, the Germans realized that their defence tactics (including swift counter attacks by specially trained troops) were succesful, yet costly. Also, the Allied had perfected their "creeping barrage" tactics. In order to save their men, they would look to ever greater depth in their defence. 1917 was the peak: withdrawal to Hindenburg Line, huge network of positions, "empty battlefield", concrete strongpoints etc. . The next year, it became obvious how little the British understood this defence doctrine.
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:iconpavelkirilovich:
PavelKirilovich Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2011
You'll like this paper I'm sending you, then. I never understood how the Germans had taken so many casualties in the early defence years, but it turns out their method for fighting defensively wasn't very good; hence the bloodletting on both sides. Amazingly, with all I've read on WWI, no historian has ever come out and said what the Germans were doing in 1914-1916 and how that differed from what they did defensively in 1917 and 1918. 1916 was very much the tipping point, as you'll see shortly.
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:iconshadowraven2006:
ShadowRaven2006 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Photographer
I think you captured that aspect, and just the general feeling of that whole time in history.
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:icontuomaskoivurinne:
tuomaskoivurinne Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you :)
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